2015/08/07

Shelter From The Storm

While we have a more substantial garage than the average Japanese household, it being a fully enclosed one car type, it isn't exactly spacious.  With three bicycles and a car in there, along with various stored items, we were pretty much at the limit, so adding a recumbent trike was not going to work.   I needed another shelter for the trike.

Bicycle shelters are not uncommon here, but they usually are erected over bare ground or gravel which results in humidity problems (read "rust").    So I went about building something with a raised floor.

A year or so ago I had replaced Momo's large bench with a smaller one which is easier for her, as an older dog, to jump onto.  The old bench was set aside and was no longer in use.   I unbolted the legs of the old one which left me with two 90 cm square platforms with rails on the bottom.

I purchased a suitably sized shelter kit made of aluminum tubing and vinyl covering.  Well, I should say that most were too small, being designed for one bike and some were too large.   I went with "too large", but it worked out fine.  I bought three sheets of 90 x 180 cm plywood (painted on one side, as suggested by K) and cut them into pieces with a circular saw to make a floor for my "trike garage".  The floor with base is heavy enough to prevent even high winds from moving it.


I screwed a center strip of plywood to hold the two platforms together, then added two larger pieces to form the front and back of the floor.   Then, I attached the base of the aluminum tube frame of the shelter to the edge of the floor using some electrical conduit straps.  I drilled countersunk holes for the flooring screws so that the floor is flat with no screw heads sticking up.
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K and I carried that into position and added the rest of the frame and the cover, which is held down by elastic cord through gromets in the cover and wrapped around the frame.   The garage measures about 160 cm wide by 220 cm long.   There is a zippered roll-up door at one end and the opening roughly matches the car garage awning width so opens right onto the concrete pad in front of the car garage.

The interior is about 170 cm high along the centerline.

I cut some left over ply to fit into the back of the garage as a shelf, coating the bare wood portion with urethane varnish along with some strips to reinforce it in the center and at the side edges.

I found some plastic ramps at the home center which make it easy to roll  a bike or the trike into and out of the garage.    Now I have a shelter which holds my Raleigh and my trike.   The bottom of the floor is about 11 cm above the ground.   My bike and trike are high and dry in any weather.

Air pump and windscreen fairing (rolled up) on the shelf in the background.  Gekko FX 26 parked inside.  Ramp along the front base for easy entry and exit.  The flag pole has a connection just below the flag for easy shortening.

I keep the Raleigh bike along side the Gekko trike.  This gives us a bit more room in the car garage.  When we're not home, it's easy to link the bike and trike together with a security cable and lock.   Of course, most of the time, the door is zipped shut.  The project took about a day to complete. 

1 comment:

Willis B. Cooper said...

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